Argyll and Bute Council public drinking ban announced

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Justice Secretary Kenny MacAskill has given Argyll and Bute Council permission to increase the area that the current Oban alcohol byelaws cover.

Argyll and Bute Council have increased the area that the Oban alcohol byelaws cover to include the areas of Soroba, Glengallan and Pulpit Hill.

It will be an offence for anyone in possession of an open container containing alcoholic liquor where it is reasonable to infer that that person intended to drink from it in public within the town.  The new byelaws come into operation on 19 February 2013.

Mr MacAskill said:

“Public drinking is often a nuisance and can greatly hamper the quality of life for residents in a particular area. All local authorities, in Scotland, already have such byelaws in force and that demonstrates how seriously local authorities are tackling the problem of reducing the nuisance and disorder commonly associated with public drinking.

“I will continue to support other councils that come forward with appropriate byelaw proposals for designated places.”

Argyll and Bute Council already have alcohol byelaws that prohibit the consumption of alcohol in a designated public place in towns and villages throughout Argyll and Bute and have now introduced new alcohol byelaws which will increase the area that the Oban alcohol byelaws cover. 

It will be an offence for any person to be in possession of an open container containing alcoholic liquor in a designated place in circumstances whereby it is reasonable to infer that that person intended to drink from it whilst in a designated place.

There are four different offences that the local authority can choose from. It is up to the local authority to decide what offence is suitable for their needs.  Any person who is guilty of breaching the byelaws is liable on summary conviction to a fine not exceeding £500 (level 2 on the standard scale).

Local authorities can submit proposals for similar byelaws under powers contained in the Local Government (Scotland) Act 1973. All local authorities in Scotland have such byelaws, which cover more than 480 towns and villages, together with the built up areas within the cities of Aberdeen, Dundee, Edinburgh and Glasgow.