Believe in yourself says Sturgeon who hails ‘Biggest Campaign in Scottish Political History’

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  Deputy First Minister Nicola Sturgeon has today urged people to believe in themselves and in Scotland by voting Yes and not to let the opportunity of a lifetime pass them by.
 
Campaigning in Glasgow, Ms Sturgeon said the Yes campaign will focus on Scotland’s wealth, job-creating powers and protection of the NHS from Westminster privatisation in the final weekend of campaigning.

  Deputy First Minister Nicola Sturgeon has today urged people to believe in themselves and in Scotland by voting Yes and not to let the opportunity of a lifetime pass them by.
 
Campaigning in Glasgow, Ms Sturgeon said the Yes campaign will focus on Scotland’s wealth, job-creating powers and protection of the NHS from Westminster privatisation in the final weekend of campaigning.

She said that Downing Street’s scaremongering has totally failed to halt the Yes campaign’s momentum, which will see Yes Scotland today running the biggest day of national campaigning the country has ever seen.

The campaigning weekend will see over 35,000 volunteers across the country at 473 registered street stalls – and 2.6 million leaflets delivered in 48 hours.

Ms Sturgeon said:

“The Yes campaign has been carried along by a flourishing of self-confidence among people in Scotland. This means we can say with certainty to people still making up their mind: ‘Let’s do this.’

“That momentum is still growing and will soon become unstoppable, as people reject the Downing Street-orchestrated campaign to talk Scotland down.

“David Cameron’s Number 10-inspired scare stories are being knocked down one by one – people simply do not believe them.”

The Deputy First Minister’s comments followed reports that Prime Minister David Cameron was now coordinating the No campaign from Downing Street.  This week it has emerged that the Conservative leader has been behind moves to persuade retailers to publish statements warning about price increases in an independent Scotland.

The move follows a string of polls which show Yes and No virtually neck and neck as we enter the last five days of campaigning.

Today, Nicola Sturgeon speaking on behalf of the Yes campaign, focused on the opportunities that independence will bring and highlighted the strength of Scotland’s economy.

She added:

“Scotland is one of the world’s richest countries – wealthier per head than the UK, France and Japan.

“The great opportunity of independence is that we’ll be able to design an economic policy tailored to our needs so that Scotland’s wealth works for the many and not just the few.

“More and more people are waking up to the opportunities of Yes which is why momentum is with this campaign.

“We’ll have the job-creating powers we need to provide more opportunity for young people and with control of our finances we can protect our NHS from the fall-out from Tory privatisation at Westminster.

“Today thousands of Yes supporters from communities across Scotland will be running the biggest campaign day of action Scotland’s ever seen.”

Meanwhile a row over the leaking to the BBC of contingency plans being considered by RBS took a new twist after it emerged Police Scotland had received a complaint from RBS shareholder Peter de Vink alleging the UK government leaked market-sensitive information about the bank.

The complaint follows the releasing of information by the UK Treasury to the broadcaster late on Wednesday night.  The BBC subsequently ran news reports which were tailored to attack the Yes campaign, suggesting the Scottish economy might be damaged.

The bank was forced to release a memo to staff apologising after they learned of the contingency plan via the media.  RBS dismissed claims that the move would lead to job losses in Scotland saying neither jobs nor operations would be affected.

Last night BBC economics editor Robert Peston revealed the Treasury released the information about plans to potentially move to London before the board of RBS had formally approved the decision and before the bank itself had informed shareholders.

First Minister Alex Salmond has demanded an inquiry into the move which he says was against market rules and could potentially have hit the RBS share price.