Free Euskotland!

59
828

By a Newsnet reporter

In a fun-filled day of protest on Saturday, a group of Basque activists have started a campaign for the Basque Country, Euskal Herria in Basque, to be annexed to Scotland to form “Euskotland” so that the Basques too can have a vote on self-determination.

By a Newsnet reporter

In a fun-filled day of protest on Saturday, a group of Basque activists have started a campaign for the Basque Country, Euskal Herria in Basque, to be annexed to Scotland to form “Euskotland” so that the Basques too can have a vote on self-determination.

The determination of Scotland to hold a referendum on independence has not gone unnoticed in the Basque Country, where the Spanish constitution prohibits any part of Spain holding a referendum on independence. 

This year members of the Basque Nationalist Party decided on a Scottish theme to their annual carnival.

Dressed in kilts and tartan, the protestors took to the streets of Bilbao to celebrate the traditional annual Basque carnival, the Jaia.  This time they christened it the Scottish Jaia.  The group have also submitted a petition to the Basque government requesting that the kilt and tartan be adopted as the Basque national dress.

Andoni Ortuzar, the leader of the Euzko Alderdi Jeltzalea-Partido Nacionalista Vasco (EAJ/PNV Basque Nationalist Party) in the province of Bizkaia, wearing a Tam o Shanter and a kilt, kicked off the proceedings with a speech in which he claimed “Euskotland exists”.

Mr Ortuzar said:  “Scotland and the Basque country are identical twins.  We appear today with a warm heart like Braveheart and with cold legs.  We come to demand the annexation of the Basque Country to Scotland.”

Mr Ortuzar highlighted the numerous parallels between Scotland and the Basque Country, we are both noted for our stubbornness, we both love football, rugby, whisky and a version of tossing the caber is a fixture of traditional Basque sport.  He noted that we both also have leaders named after fish, Alex Salmón and Patxi Lo-Pez (‘the fish’).

Mr Ortuzar also pointed out that both countries have a centuries long dispute with their southern neighbours.  He added:  “We are like two drops of water, except that they are going to decide for themselves but we are told we can’t.”