Murray through to Wimbledon final after dramatic win over Tsonga

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By a Newsnet reporter
 
Andy Murray is through to his first ever Wimbledon final after a 6-3, 6-4, 3-6, 7-5 win against Frenchman Jo-Wilfried Tsonga.

The Scot came through in dramatic scenes that witnessed a line challenge on the final rally of the match.

By a Newsnet reporter
 
Andy Murray is through to his first ever Wimbledon final after a 6-3, 6-4, 3-6, 7-5 win against Frenchman Jo-Wilfried Tsonga.

The Scot came through in dramatic scenes that witnessed a line challenge on the final rally of the match.

An enthralling contest saw both men entertain the crowd with some fantastic tennis.  Murray gained the initial upperhand before Tsonga came back to put the Scot under severe pressure.

The match began with a series of unforced errors by Tsonga as the Frenchman struggled to get into his stride.  Some solid play by the British number one saw Murray take the first set 6-3.

The second set began with both men holding their early service games with some impressive serves from Murray standing out.

At two games all with Tsonga serving, some outstanding returns from Murray earned the Scot a series of break points and the he duly took advantage with the third of three.

A set up and a break up, Murray then held his own serve to take a four games to two lead.  The remaining games went with serve and at five games to four Murray again held to take a two sets to love lead.

The Frenchman called for his trainer, complaining about problems with his back, but in truth the problems were at the opposite side of the net for Tsonga.  This was a composed Murray, and Tsonga appeared to have no answer to the Scots all round game. 

The third set began with the centre court bathed in sunshine and Tsonga held to take the first game, an ace securing it for the Frenchman.

Some lax play by Murray saw the Scot face three break points on his own serve and Tsonga secured it at the first attempt.  A chink of light for the Frenchman, who now found himself two games to love up at the start of the third. 

A hold of serve gave Tsonga a three game to love advantage and Murray suddenly found himself under a bit of pressure.  The rejuvenated Frenchman kept up some impressive play, but an under-hit return on a Murray second serve at breakpoint meant he missed an opportunity to go two breaks up.

At three games to one in Tsonga’s favour, the Frenchman held despite facing a couple of break points – it was now four games to one in the third.

Both men again traded service games and at five games to three in Tsonga’s favour the Frenchman served out to take the set 6-3.  Visions of his comeback against Federer last year after going two sets down must have entered his mind.

Two sets to one in Murray’s favour and it was game on.

The fourth started with Murray holding his serve without too much effort, a couple of unforced errors from Tsonga helping.  Tsonga responded with a couple of big serves on his own game and it was one game all.

Murray held to make it two games to one and the pressure was mounting on Tsonga who was showing worrying signs of inconsistency, his game seemingly plagued by unforced errors.

The fourth game saw Murray earn a double break point with a forehand smash that left Tsonga helpless.  The Scot then hit wonderful return that led to the Frenchman hitting long – Murray was a crucial break up.

However any thoughts that Tsonga had given up were dispelled when the Frenchman showed character and broke back immediately.

With Tsonga then holding his own serve it was now three games all and this key fourth set was up for grabs.

Murray held easily to make it four games to three and the pressure was back on Tsonga.  The Frenchman then survived two break points and it was four all, the pressure was now on Murray.

At 15-40 it was Murray’s turn to face two break points, as with Tsonga in the previous game his nerve held and it was now five games to four in the Scots favour.

Tsonga needed to hold serve to stay in the match, which he did comfortably and it was now five games all.

Murray held serve in an increasingly nervy encounter to go six five up and it was again Tsonga having to hold serve to stay in the match.

Murray took first honours, it was love fifteen.

The Scot took the next point and it was love thirty.

Tsonga won the next, it was fifteen thirty.

When Tsonga hit the ball into the net on the next rally it gave Murray two match points and the crowd cheered in anticipation.

Murray then hit a spectacular cross court shot that was called out – a winner if it had landed in … but Murray challenged the call and the crowd held their breath. 

Both men walked to the net, as hawkeye played the shot in its now famous slow-motion computer generated replay … the crowd waited and watched … and then erupted, the ball was in.

Scotland’s Andy Murray was in the Wimbledon final – history made and perhaps more to come.  The first men’s finalist from the British Isles since 1938.

Federer now awaits the Scotsman.