Reid legacy to be subject of school studies

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First Minister Alex Salmond has pledged to make union leader Jimmy Reid’s famous 1972 Glasgow University Rectorial address available to every secondary pupil.

After the funeral in Glasgow, Education Secretary Michael Russell confirmed the arrangements that will mean a new section on the LTS (Learning Teaching Scotland) educational website containing the address and other material.


First Minister Alex Salmond has pledged to make union leader Jimmy Reid’s famous 1972 Glasgow University Rectorial address available to every secondary pupil.

After the funeral in Glasgow, Education Secretary Michael Russell confirmed the arrangements that will mean a new section on the LTS (Learning Teaching Scotland) educational website containing the address and other material.

Mr Russell said:
“The First Minister’s initiative in ensuring that a speech described by the New York Times as ‘the greatest speech since President Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address’ is made as widely available as possible – and in particular that it is made easily accessible to secondary school pupils in Scottish schools – will be warmly welcomed throughout the country.

“Jimmy used to say that he had to discover Scottish History for himself as it was not taught to pupils of his generation. Fortunately, that is no longer true but we always need to keep updating what is studied and read, and I have no doubt that Jimmy’s vision, humanity and wisdom are a lesson to us all. They have great relevance to our past, present and future.

“The Rectorial Address, along with biographical and other material, including video and audio clips, will be brought together over the next few weeks to form not just a comprehensive tribute but also a comprehensive learning resource.

“I will also ensure it is promoted to teachers as very suitable for inclusion in cross curricular activity within the Curriculum for Excellence. In that way, it will match the many other new resources for Curriculum for Excellence already on line or being developed.”